+ Death Valley Roadtrip

The Open Road
Death Valley - Artists Drive
Death Valley - Artists Palette
Death Valley - View of Badwater Basin
Death Valley - Badwater Basin at Sunrise

The Open Road

Drove down to Death Valley - this was the view for at least half the drive. It always amazes me how much open space is out there - makes me feel so small.

Death Valley - Artists Drive

This was taken along the one way Artists Drive in Death Valley. In the distance you can see a small camper - very small in the very large landscape.

Death Valley - Artists Palette

Artists Palette is on the face of the Black Mountains and is noted for having various colors of rock. These colors are caused by the oxidation of different metals (red, pink and yellow is from iron salts, green is from decomposing tuff-derived mica, and manganese produces the purple). Called the Artist Drive Formation, the rock unit provides evidence for one of the Death Valley area's most violently explosive volcanic periods. The Miocene-aged formation is made up of cemented gravel, playa deposits, and much volcanic debris, perhaps 5,000 feet (1500 m) thick. Chemical weathering and hydrothermal alteration are also responsible for the variety of colors displayed in the Artist Drive Formation and nearby exposures of the Furnace Creek Formation. Wikipedia

Death Valley - View of Badwater Basin

This picture was taken from the dirt road that leads to the Natural Bridge in Death Valley. The basin is 282 feet below sea level - the lowest point in North America.

Death Valley - Badwater Basin at Sunrise

This location is 282 feet below sea level - the lowest in all of North America. The site consists of a small spring-fed pool of "bad water" next to the road in a sink; the accumulated salts of the surrounding basin make it undrinkable, thus giving it the name. Adjacent to the pool, where water is not always present at the surface, repeated freeze–thaw and evaporation cycles gradually push the thin salt crust into hexagonal honeycomb shapes. (Wikipedia)